BOOKS

NEWFlower Petals Fall, but the Flower Endures

Flower Petals Fall, but the Flower Endures

The Japanese Philosophy of Transience

Takeuchi Seiichi

Published by JPIC | ISBN 978-4-86658-069-2 (Paperback) | 198 pages | 210mm (h) x 148mm (w) | Hardcover edition March 2015 | Paperback New English edition January 2019

花びらは散る 花は散らない

花びらは散る 花は散らない
―無常の日本思想
竹内 整一 著
KADOKAWA 刊

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About the Book

Life is short and transient. The feeling that this evokes is called mujōkan in Japanese. Rather than falling into the despair that is so prevalent in the present day, mujōkan allows one to accept transience proactively as a sign of vibrant life. In this book Takeuchi Seiichi examines this view of life from the perspectives of philosophy, literature, art, and religion. He delves into the Japanese concepts of grief and pain, life and death, reaching to the very core of the Japanese spirit. This book presents a full record of Takeuchi’s valedictory lectures in commemoration of his retirement from the University of Tokyo.

About the Author

TAKEUCHI Seiichi

Born in Nagano in 1946, Takeuchi Seiichi graduated from the University of Tokyo in 1971 and entered the doctoral program of the Graduate School of Humanities and Sociology, but withdrew before receiving his degree. Over a long and distinguished academic career he has been a professor in the Faculty of Letters at the University of Tokyo, a professor at Kamakura Women’s University, and is now a professor emeritus at the University of Tokyo. He served two terms as the chairperson of the Japanese Society for Ethics. He specializes in ethics and Japanese intellectual history. His primary interest is the spiritual history of Japan and how that history is reflected in the lives of modern Japanese. His numerous books include “Onozukara” to “mizukara” (“Onozukara” and “Mizukara”; Shunjusha, 2004); Nihonjin wa naze “sayōnara” to wakareru no ka (Why Japanese Say “Sayonara” on Parting; Chikuma Shobo, 2009); “Kanashimi” no tetsugaku (The Philosophy of “Sorrow”; NHK Books, 2009); Aritenakereba (As Fleeting as a Dream; Kadokawa, 2015); “Yasashisa” to Nihonjin (Yasashisa and the Japanese People; Chikuma Shobo, 2016) and Nihonshisō no kotoba (The Vocabulary of Japanese Thought; Kadokawa, 2016).